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As a frontline homelessness organisation, we deliver positive outcomes for those experiencing homelessness. 

Rough sleeping is on the rise:

  • The number of people estimated to be sleeping rough on a single night in autumn 2023 is 3,898, which has risen for the second year in a row but remains lower than the peak in 2017.

  • The number of people estimated to be sleeping rough on a single night in autumn 2023 has risen by 27% since 2022. This is a decrease of 9% since 2019, which was before the introduction of COVID-19 related measures and is 18% lower than the peak in 2017. It is an increase of 120% since 2010 when the snapshot approach was introduced.

  • The rate of people sleeping rough on a single night in England in 2023 is 6.8 people per 100,000. This has increased since 2022 (5.4 per 100,000), though remains lower than the peak in 2017 (8.5 per 100,000)

  • Rough sleeping has increased in every region of England compared to the previous year.

  • The largest increase in the number of people estimated to be sleeping rough is in London, where there were 1,132 people this year compared to 858 people in 2022, an increase of 274 people or 32%.

  • Nearly half (46%) of all people sleeping rough on a single night in autumn are in London and the South East, which is similar to previous years.

  • A small number of local authorities have driven increases. Twenty local authorities (7% of all areas) drive over half the increase in the number of people sleeping rough on a single night. In just over two-fifths of local authorities (42%), the number of people sleeping rough decreased or stayed the same compared to 2022.

  • The majority of people sleeping rough in England are male, aged over 26 years old and from the UK. This is similar to previous years.

Data from gov.uk

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Mildmay provides inpatient care for homeless patients who have been 'stepped down' from acute care.

 

We deliver medical care and treatment to a vulnerable group that is in desperate need. This work is alongside our ongoing work with HIV.

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Post-detox inpatient rehabilitation care for patients who are homeless or rough-sleeping.

We deliver safe and effective inpatient post-detoxification, recovery-focused care for people who sleep rough, are in hostel accommodation and/or are at risk of returning to the streets.

Patients are admitted to Mildmay after being stepped down following detoxification treatment at acute centres in London like the Addiction Clinical Care Suite for homeless people at Guys and St. Thomas’s Hospital - one of our partners in this programme.

Less?        is an informative film created by NHS England, Pathway UK, and Groundswell. It is about personal stories and journeys to health by people who have experienced and overcome homelessness.

Film-maker CJ Barton interviewed people with lived experiences of homelessness, sharing their stories with us, through the medium of film.

The film's website contains a discussion guide to help foster reflective discussions with friends, peers, or colleagues about homelessness, and we encourage you to share it with them.

 

There are also additional links and resources, and a feedback form to contact the film's makers.

While the tone of the film is optimistic, it does contain references to depression and suicide.
If you need help please contact 111, or speak to Samaritans on 116 123.

Goals and outcomes

Our purpose is two-fold

Our aims are that:

 

  1. No rough sleepers die on the street

  2. No one is discharged from a hospital to the street

  3. There is equal and fair access to healthcare for those who are homeless.

1. To deliver better care and health outcomes for homeless patients

2. To make more efficient use of all available health resources by freeing up NHS acute beds and providing medical respite/rehabilitation for this vulnerable cohort, improving the likelihood of a safe and full recovery.

Our funding

About 80-90% of funding for patients who are homeless is covered by NHS contracts, and we depend on your help to secure the remainder so that we can deliver high-quality services and provide the best facilities in our hospital.

Mildmay is a charity providing specialist services to the NHS, not an NHS or private hospital. We don't make a profit, and all donations are invested in our services and facilities.

Help us secure the future of our UK hospital in developing the Homeless Pathway, so we can ensure equal and fair access to healthcare for those who are homeless.

Healthcare challenges of people who are homeless

People who are homeless experience some of the worst health problems in society. The longer a person experiences homelessness, particularly from young adulthood, the more likely their health and wellbeing will be at risk. Co-morbidity (two or more diseases or disorders occurring in the same person) among the longer-term homeless population is common.

34

times more likely to have tuberculosis

50

times more likely to have Hepatitis C

12

times more likely to have epilepsy

6

times more likely to have heart disease

5

times more likely to have a stroke

2.5

times more likely to have asthma

Data courtesy of Pathway

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